11 Jan

Why we need CSS subgrid

I’m a huge fan of CSS Grid and I use it on pretty much every project these days. However, there’s one part of it that makes things much more complicated than they really ought to be: the lack of subgrids. And in this post on the matter, Ken Bellows explains why they’d be so gosh darn useful:

But one thing still missing from the Level 1 spec is the ability to create a subgrid, a grid-item with its own grid

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28 Nov

What If?

Harry Roberts writes about working on a project with a rather nasty design flaw. The website was entirely dependent on images loading before rendering any of the content. He digs into why this bad for accessibility and performance but goes further to describe how this can ripple into other problems:

While ever you build under the assumption that things will always work smoothly, you’re leaving yourself completely ill-equipped to handle the scenario that they don’t. Remember the fallacies; think …

The post What If? appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

28 Nov

What If?

Harry Roberts writes about working on a project with a rather nasty design flaw. The website was entirely dependent on images loading before rendering any of the content. He digs into why this bad for accessibility and performance but goes further to describe how this can ripple into other problems:

While ever you build under the assumption that things will always work smoothly, you’re leaving yourself completely ill-equipped to handle the scenario that they don’t. Remember the fallacies; think …

The post What If? appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

26 Nov

You might not need a loop

Ire Aderinokun has written a nifty piece using loops and when we might consider replacing it with another method, say .map() and .filter(). I particularly like what she has to say here:

As I mentioned earlier, loops are a great tool for a lot of cases, and the existence of these new methods doesn't mean that loops shouldn't be used at all.

I think these methods are great because they provide code that is in a way self-documenting. When …

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22 Nov

State of Houdini (Chrome Dev Summit 2018)

Here’s a great talk by Das Surma where he looks into what Houdini is and how much of it is implemented in browsers. If you’re unfamiliar with that, Houdini is a series of technologies and APIs that gives developers low level access to how CSS properties work in a fundamental way. Check out Ana Tudor's deep dive into its impact on animations for some incredible examples of it in practice.

What I particularly like about this video is the way …

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19 Nov

Why can’t we use Functional CSS and regular CSS at the same time?

Harry Nicholls recently wrote all about simplifying styles with functional CSS and you should definitely check it out. In short, functional CSS is another name for atomic CSS or using “helper” or “utility” classes that would just handle padding or margin, background-color or color, for example.

Harry completely adores the use of adding multiple classes like this to an element:

So what I'm trying to advocate here is taking advantage of the work that others have done in …

The post Why can’t we use Functional CSS and regular CSS at the same time? appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

13 Sep

XOXO 2018

There’s not much talk about frameworks here. There’s no shaming about old techniques, or jokes about JavaScript. There’s just a couple hundred people all around me laughing and smiling and watching talks about making things on the web and it all feels so fresh and new to me. Unlike many other conferences I’ve visited, these talks are somehow inclusive and rather feel, well, there’s no other word for it: inspiring.

I’m sitting in a little room buried underneath the …

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